Thursday, March 23, 2017

Immigration Matters: Article 50 date 29 March 2017 and UK Brexit within...

Immigration Matters: Article 50 date 29 March 2017 and UK Brexit within...: Earlier this week Prime Minister Theresa May announced that the Article 50 process to take Britain out of the European Union will be forma...

Article 50 date 29 March 2017 and UK Brexit within 2 years

Earlier this week Prime Minister Theresa May announced that the Article 50 process to take Britain out of the European Union will be formally triggered on 29 March 2017.



UK Prime Minister Theresa May

The historic decision will start a two year period of intense negotiations with the UK’s EU partners over tariffs, membership of the single market and customs union, free movement of labour and immigration rights for the millions of European and British migrants who live in various parts of Europe.

In a statement, Brexit Secretary David Davis said: “We are on the threshold of the most important negotiation for this country for a generation.

“The Government is clear in its aims: a deal that works for every nation and region of the UK and indeed for all of Europe – a new, positive partnership between the UK and our friends and allies in the European Union.”

The fate of three million EU migrants living in the UK is still in the balance, as thousands apply for indefinite leave and British Citizenship. Since millions of British citizens live in EU countries and the UK still needs skilled foreign labour, there will be no mass deportations.

Despite the divorce, custody arrangements will have to be made. After all, like a divorced couple with children, the affairs of Britain and EU member states will be inexorably intertwined for many years to come.  

UK net migration fell by 49,000 to 273,000 in the year to September 2016 according to Office for National Statistics (ONS).

Immigration to the UK is estimated to be 596,000 – made up of 268,000 EU citizens, 257,000 non-EU citizens and 71,000 British citizens.

Whilst EU immigration from several countries went down, record numbers of Romanians and Bulgarians - 74,000 – came to live in the UK.

In the meantime, current UK Immigration Rules and EEA regulations still apply.

The historic week ends on a sad note following tragic events which took place in Westminster on Wednesday. Our condolences go out to the families of the people who lost their lives or suffered serious injuries, including a Police Officer and an American and Romanian tourist.

See also:


Minimum £18,600 income for foreign spouses lawful "in principle", Supreme Court rules

The UK is an attractive place to work, start a business or buy property, with no restrictions on foreign buyers and a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates. Last week, a leading mortgage lender announced that it was introducing a fixed rate mortgage with an interest rate of .99%.

If you would like to learn more about investing in UK property, I have a limited number of complimentary tickets to a LIVE EVENT  - Beginners Property Course (held in the UK), which will give you the basic knowledge and techniques to get started as a property investor. If you are interest, email me your full name and telephone number to euukimmigration@gmail.com.


Sunday, March 19, 2017

Immigration Matters: UK Visa £1,000 Immigration Skills charge on Tier 2...

Immigration Matters: UK Visa £1,000 Immigration Skills charge on Tier 2...: The new Immigration Skills Charge for large numbers of Tier 2 holders will come into force from 6 April 2017.  The Home Office levy will b...

UK Visa £1,000 Immigration Skills charge on Tier 2 working Visas starts 6 April 2017

The new Immigration Skills Charge for large numbers of Tier 2 holders will come into force from 6 April 2017.  The Home Office levy will be imposed on UK employers holding Tier 2 sponsorship licences employing non-EEA migrants on Tier 2 working visas.


UK Home Office

The Guardian recently reported that the skills levy on foreign workers could be extended to EU and EEA migrants post Brexit in order to reduce immigration and encourage employers to hire British workers first. Britain’s policy on European migrants resident in the UK has yet to be decided and will probably form part of ongoing negotiations once article 50 has been triggered later this month.

Net migration to the UK fell by 49,000 last year following the Brexit vote, but more likely due to earlier curbs on immigration. Meanwhile, thousands of EU citizens are applying for UK passports and Indefinite Leave to Remain (permanent residence) in the panic to beat possible Home Office restrictions.

The UK Immigration Minister, Robert Goodwill, has stated that that British businesses were over reliant on migrant labour and said that an apprenticeship levy would be put in place later in 2017, in order to help meet the government’s pledge to train more than three million apprentices prior to the 2020 general election.

Mr Goodwill said: “In April this year we are also bringing in the immigration skills charge for non-EEA skilled workers. If you want to recruit an Indian computer programmer on a four-year contract on top of the existing visa charges and the resident labour market test there will be a fee of £1,000 per year.

“So for a four-year contract that employer will need to pay a £4,000 immigration skills charge. That is something that currently applies to non-EU and it has been suggested to us that could be applied to EU.”.

In excess of 16,000 EU citizens were granted UK citizenship last year, indicating that despite Brexit and all the 'doom and gloom' predictions many Europeans want to remain living in Britain.

The UK is an attractive place to work, start a business or buy property, with no restrictions on foreign buyers and a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates. Last week, a leading mortgage lender announced that it was introducing a fixed rate mortgage with an interest rate of .99%.

If you would like to learn more about investing in UK property, I have a limited number of complimentary tickets to a LIVE EVENT  - Beginners Property Course (held in the UK), which will give you the basic knowledge and techniques to get started as a property investor. If you are interest, email me your full name and telephone number to euukimmigration@gmail.com.

Turn Your Passion into Profit

Monday, March 13, 2017

Immigration Matters: Pop star Lily Allen in NHS immigration spat on Twi...

Immigration Matters: Pop star Lily Allen in NHS immigration spat on Twi...: Singer songwriter Lily Allen has once again got involved in a public dispute on social media, this time over an argument about immigration...

Pop star Lily Allen in NHS immigration spat on Twitter after her two-year-old daughter had to wait to see a doctor at A&E

Singer songwriter Lily Allen has once again got involved in a public dispute on social media, this time over an argument about immigration after criticising NHS cuts after her daughter's wait at accident and emergency (A&E), the Daily Mail reports.



Lily Allen

Lily, 31-year-old said she took her two-year-old daughter, Marnie, to hospital after she impaled her neck on railings, but was put out when they had to wait  (like the rest of us) despite having a serious injury.

Then Allen, who launched her career on social media sites, such as My Space (remember them?). got into an online row with a Twitter user who blamed the NHS wait on immigration.

A Twitter user, - Twitter handle is @Trumpskins2016 - tweeted that Ms Allen did not care about 'preserving' English heritage because she is rich. 

Lily, who has 5.9 million followers on Twitter handle +Lily Allen, picked up the tweet and hit back: 'What do you mean when you speak of heritage, and also how you have come to the conclusion that money gets in the way of caring about it? '

The user, who must have been ecstatic to receive a reply, escalated the argument: 'You're rich so the impact of mass immigration doesn't effect you. People have been saying this to you over and over again.'

Lily defended her stance: 'I doubt it's fault of immigrants that you can't get someone to procreate with you. If that is the type of heritage you are referring to.' 

The user came back with: 'like to see how Lily would react to tons of immigrants being moved to the area she lives.'

Lily revealed that she lived in London near 'lots of immigrants' and had 'no problems'.

On her Twitter feed Lily says she lives near Greeks, Japanese and Scandinavians.

Specifically pointing to her daughter's hospital wait, the user then said: 'The UK is overcrowded. Liberals like yourself have allowed it to happen.'

Lily wrote: 'My daughter wasn't seen because the hospital, like most in the UK, are understaffed because of cuts, not because of immigrants.' 

Lily said that she has seen the decline in the NHS and added that the number of midwife visits has gone down.

The mother-of-three added: 'I've seen its decline. When I had my first baby, the midwife came every day.

'Only three years into a Tory government we had one visit. It was pretty bad. It's horrendous.' 

Lily has previously criticised the NHS four years ago after she claimed she had received lack of attention when she gave birth to Marnie, who was two at the time of the 2015 incident.

Writing on Twitter: 'After speaking to the Brent midwifery team at 7 this morning, I was told to stay in all day and someone would be over to weigh my baby and do a jaundice assessment.

'Waited all day, and nothing, not even a phone call.'

She told followers: 'I don't mean to moan and I know how over stretched the health service is. But I can't help but think about how mothers with less support, both financially and emotionally are meant to cope.' 


The NHS, which is barely out of the news, would probably not be able to function without migrant workers in every department. Nurses are still being recruited from the EU and countries like India and the Philippines.

In other news, the EU Brexit bill is proceeding after a stumbling block in the House of Lords and Prime Minister Theresa May could trigger the 'Article 50' official leaving process this month.

Three million EU nationals living in the UK are still unsure of their fate, prompting thousands of European migrants to apply for indefinite leave to remain and UK citizenship.

Most I speak to have no intention of leaving and plan to settle in the UK. Unlike many EU countries, the UK has jobs, unrestricted access to healthcare and welfare and jobs.


Saturday, March 04, 2017

Immigration Matters: UK population will hit 70 million bringing fears a...

Immigration Matters: UK population will hit 70 million bringing fears a...: The population of the UK will soar to over 70 million and become the largest in Europe by 2050, bigger than France and Germany, due to an ...

UK population will hit 70 million bringing fears and opportunities

The population of the UK will soar to over 70 million and become the largest in Europe by 2050, bigger than France and Germany, due to an ageing population and immigration, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

ONS figures show there has been more births than deaths in every year since 1976, which combined with a net migration increase over around 250,00 per annum has swelled the UK population to 65 million. By 2045 the population will reach 76 million experts predict.

Over 65's will hit 25% in 30 years

The age time bomb is an issue all over Europe and a quarter of the UK population will be over 65 within the next 30 years. The current generation does not appear to be as prudent as their predecessors when it comes to saving, with millions holding less than £100 in the bank and going through life in perpetual debt. 

Increasing life expectancy is another factor in the population increase, as people live longer, due to improved healthcare and lifestyles, and will be drawing their state pension for many more years than the schemes were expected to run. In future, Girls born in 2015 are expected to live 82.8 years from birth, and boys to 79.1 years. 

The proportion of people aged over 65 has increased from 14.1 per cent in 1975 to 17.8 per cent in 2015 - which means there is a lower proportion working people paying taxes to support pensions and healthcare for the elderly - and the is projected to reach a quarter of the population by 2045.

There will be an extra 10 million over 65s in 2045 than there were in 1975 - accounting for over half of the population growth seen in that period.

The UK will have a larger population than any European Union country by 2050, at 77 million, according to Eurostat. The UK is the third biggest country, after Germany and France, which has falling birth rates and an ageing population.

The proportion of working citizens is projected to fall as a result of the growth of the ageing population, which has huge implications for pensions, housing and employment.

Immigration to the UK and overall net migration has helped boost the population by 250,000 per year over the last two decades, which did fall slightly last year. In 2015, 631,500 people immigrated to the UK, while emigration was 299,200. 

Opportunities and fears

A growing population is good for the economy as it can mean that there are more people available to participate in the workforce and provide jobs in service sectors such as healthcare and leisure.
However, an ageing population will lead to strains on the NHS and other public services. Estimates show there were 308 of a pensionable age for every 1,000 people of a working age in 2016 - and this figure is projected to increase to 365 in 2037. 

When releasing the data, the ONS said: "While living longer is a cause for celebration, an ageing population may result in fewer people of working age to support those of pension age.

"This increase means that there will be fewer people of working age to support a larger population over State Pension age. While a larger population increases the size and productive capacity of the workforce, it also increases pressure and demand for services such as education, healthcare and housing."

In the government White Paper, Housing Minister Gavin Barwell admits that the housing system is broken and wants the country to build hundreds of thousands of new homes every year to cope with demand and the current shortage. In order to build, employers will need skilled labour, which means workers from the EU will still be in demand. In turn, this initially creates more housing demand.


More houses will be needed

Last year, 16,000 EU citizens were granted UK citizenship, indicating that despite Brexit many Europeans want to remain living in Britain.

The reason people migrate here is because the UK is an attractive place to work, start a business or buy property – no restrictions on foreign buyers - a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates.

See also:








Friday, March 03, 2017

Immigration Matters: Uber loses High Court case to block English langua...

Immigration Matters: Uber loses High Court case to block English langua...: Uber has been defeated in the High Court in a legal bid to prevent their drivers being required to take an English language test in order ...

Uber loses High Court case to block English language tests for migrant drivers

Uber has been defeated in the High Court in a legal bid to prevent their drivers being required to take an English language test in order to work in London.


Driverless cars are already here

The multi-billion dollar tech giant, which does not own any taxis despite controlling millions of journeys, took its case to court after Transport for London (TfL) said that drivers should have to sit a test in order to demonstrate their ability to communicate in English.

Uber’s lawyers argued that the TFL standard of reading and writing required by the test was excessive claiming it was "unfair and disproportionate" and will appeal against the court's decision.

Rejecting Uber's claim, Judge John Mitting said:

"TfL are entitled to require private hire drivers to demonstrate English language compliance".
However, Tom de la Mare QC, for Uber and the drivers, told the judge that the language requirement would result in 70,000 applicants, including mini cab drivers, failing to obtain a licence over three years.

He added that the proposals would have a disproportionate impact on drivers from countries where English was not generally spoken and give rise to "indirect discrimination on grounds of race and nationality".

TfL maintain that the requirements were vital to ensure passenger safety and to raise standards.

Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, defended Tfl:


"Drivers being able to speak English and understand information from passengers and licensing requirements is a vital part of ensuring passengers get the high standard of service they need and deserve”.

Drivers should be more concerned about Uber's bigger plans to eventually dispense with the need for drivers altogether. The company is already tested self-driving cars with Volvo driverless cars on in a Pittsburgh based trial.


Thursday, February 23, 2017

Immigration Matters: Immigration to UK falling post-Brexit

Immigration Matters: Immigration to UK falling post-Brexit: UK net migration dropped by 49,000 to 273,000 in the year to September 2016. Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures reveal. ...

Immigration to UK falling post-Brexit




UK net migration dropped by 49,000 to 273,000 in the year to September 2016. Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures reveal.

This is the first time in two years that the net migration figure - the difference between the number of people arriving and leaving the UK - had dropped below 300,000.

Overall immigration to the UK is estimated to be 596,000 – made up of 268,000 EU citizens, 257,000 non-EU citizens and 71,000 British citizens.

Whilst EU immigration from several countries fell, record numbers of Romanians and Bulgarians - 74,000 – came to live in the UK.

Around 323,000 people may have left the UK, slightly up on the previous year by 26,000.

The levers are estimated include 128,000 British citizens, 103,000 EU citizens and 93,000 non-EU citizens, although exact figures for legal and illegal immigration in the UK are almost impossible to calculate.

In summary, the overall number of people arriving to work in the UK is about the same as previous years. The UK has jobs and low skilled work, while other EU countries, such as Romania, Bulgaria, Spain, Italy, Portugal and Greece all have high levels of unemployment, especially for the youth.

Over 16,000 EU citizens were granted UK citizenship last year, indicating that despite Brexit many Europeans want to remain living in Britain.

Meanwhile, property prices in London and the south east of England have reached levels beyond the means of young first time buyers, many of whom have become long-term renters or are living at home with their parents well into their 30's. Home ownership levels are falling.

The UK is still an attractive place to work, start a business and buy property – no restrictions on foreign buyers - a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates.

Learn how you can get involved in the buy-to-let boom with this free CD training programme:



Immigration Matters: UK net migration drops but immigration from Romani...

Immigration Matters: UK net migration drops but immigration from Romani...: UK net migration fell by 49,000 to 273,000 in the year to September 2016. Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures reveal. This is...

UK net migration drops but immigration from Romania and Bulgaria soars to record levels



UK net migration fell by 49,000 to 273,000 in the year to September 2016. Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures reveal.

This is the first time in two years that the net migration figure - the difference between the number of people arriving and leaving the UK - had dropped below 300,000.

Overall immigration to the UK is estimated to be 596,000 – made up of 268,000 EU citizens, 257,000 non-EU citizens and 71,000 British citizens.

Whilst EU immigration from several countries fell, record numbers of Romanians and Bulgarians - 74,000 – came to live in the UK.

Around 323,000 people may have left the UK, slightly up on the previous year by 26,000.

The levers are estimated include 128,000 British citizens, 103,000 EU citizens and 93,000 non-EU citizens, although exact figures for legal and illegal immigration in the UK are almost impossible to calculate.

Anglicising the figures, BBC Home Affairs Correspondent, Dominic Casciani, said:

“Net migration is down. But while the net decrease looks substantial, nobody can say for sure what's triggered the change because these quarterly figures could have been influenced by a string of short-term factors.

“For a start, there appears to have been a rise in emigration - and when that goes up, net migration can come down.

“Secondly, some of the change could be down to seasonal fluctuations in student numbers.

“Thirdly, although there were significant departures by people from some parts of Eastern Europe, the number coming from poorer Romania and Bulgaria went up.”

In summary, the overall number of people arriving to work in the UK is about the same as previous years. The UK still has jobs, while other EU countries, such as Romania, Bulgaria, Spain, Italy, Portugal and Greece all have high levels of unemployment.

Over 16,000 EU citizens were granted UK citizenship last year, indicating that despite Brexit many Europeans want to remain living in Britain.

The UK is an attractive place to work, start a business or buyproperty – no restrictions on foreign buyers - a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates.

See also:

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Immigration Matters: Minimum £18,000 income for foreign spouses lawful ...

Immigration Matters: Minimum £18,000 income for foreign spouses lawful ...: The Supreme Court has ruled that controversial minimum income rules for non-EEA spouses set by the Home Office, which campaigners say have...

Minimum £18,600 income for foreign spouses lawful "in principle", Supreme Court rules

The Supreme Court has ruled that controversial minimum income rules for non-EEA spouses set by the Home Office, which campaigners say have split thousands of families apart preventing British citizens bringing their foreign spouse to the UK, are lawful "in principle".

Children's welfare, Judges said, must be protected in immigration decisions. In their judgement, the Judges conceded that the UK government's rules had the "legitimate" aim of ensuring "that the couple do not have recourse to benefits and have sufficient resources to play a full part in British life".

However, tossing a legal ‘spanner in the works’, they added the rules fail because they do not treat "the best interests of children as a primary consideration".



Prime Minister Mrs Theresa May

Since 2012, when Theresa May was Home Secretary, British citizens have been required to earn over £18,600 ($23,140) before a husband or wife from outside the European Economic Area (EEA) could be allowed to settle in the UK.

Seven Judges sitting at the highest court in the land rejected an appeal by families who argued that the rules breached their human right to a family life, stating that the minimum income requirement was "acceptable in principle". But said that the rules failed to take "proper account" of the duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children when making decisions which affect them.

Judges want an amendment to the law, introduced to prevent foreign souses becoming dependent on taxpayer benefits, allowing alternative sources of funding, other than a salary or benefits, to be considered in a claim.

The minimum income rises to £22,400 ($27,870) where couples have a child who does not have British citizenship - and then by an additional £2,400 ($2,986) for each subsequent child.

Previously, applicants had to demonstrate to the Home Office that the incoming partner would not be a drain on public resources and that the couple or family could adequately support themselves.

The Immigration Rule on income, as well as English tests, has proved controversial throwing up many anomalies, such as a British citizen who marries a non-EEA person while working abroad for a period of time who then cannot take their spouse back to the UK because their work contract has ended and they have no job in Britain, let alone six month pay slips.

The threshold does not apply to spouses from within the EEA and some British citizens have taken advantage of earlier judgements, such as Surinder Singh to bring in souses via the EEA without the need to show the minimum income.

The UK is an attractive place to work, start a business or buy property – no restrictions on foreign buyers - a vibrant mortgage market with record low interest rates.

Learn how you can get involved in the buy-to-let boom with this free CD training programme: